Course description

Participant testimonial:

Ms. Upulka Weeraratne, Deputy General Manager (Energy Marketing), Ceylon Electricity Board (CEB)


Economic, legal, technical and financial skills are central to the administrative and economic regulation of the public utilities. The constantly changing environment not only requires proper response from the regulatory side, it is also essential to be aware of the global trends in the energy sector. The current economic climate across the world and the emergence of renewable energy sources have pointed to the need of addressing recent technological innovations that demand a different approach to regulatory practice. Corresponding to these new challenges the training course aims to focus on some of the discussed topics from a “smart perspective”.

 

Course Objectives:

This 6-day training course will be organised into thematic modules focusing on the hottest issues and global trends of energy sector regulation. The training program combines “classic” regulation under the traditional vertically integrated industry structure with up-to-date issues of regulation by discussing the topics from a “smart” point of view. The prime objective of the course is to provide basic technical, economic and legal regulatory skills that are needed to design and manage successful regulatory systems for the energy industry.

 

During the Course the following broad themes are addressed:

  • Role and functions of the regulator
  • Price and tariff regulation
  • Competition and regulation in electricity and gas
  • The interlinks between energy policy and regulation
  • Investment, innovation incentives and conclusion
  • + A full day site visit to Paks Nuclear Power Plant

 

Visit to Paks Nuclear Power Plant

The program will feature a day-long visit of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant which has been generating electricity for more than 30 years. The plant will be extended with two new power units (each with the capacity of 1200MW by the late 2020s). The program will include presentation of the Visitors’ Centre followed by a guided tour of the Secondary System.

Target Audience:

The course is available to practising energy regulators and to non-regulators such as ministry and local government representatives, banking institutions, law and investment firms, consulting companies and regulated utility companies.

 

Course Syllabus:

MODULE 1 – ROLE AND FUNCTIONS OF THE REGULATOR (Day 1 – Monday)

The principal objectives of the regulatory institutions are a) to protect energy consumers from monopoly pricing and behaviour; b) to protect private investment from politically dictated prices and from regulatory uncertainty and c) to monitor and foster energy market competition. In order to meet the above objectives under a private and increasingly competitive industry setting, the regulator should be a decision making body highly independent from short-term political influences and direct industry interests. This module provides participants with an overview on the objectives as well as on the institutional setting and decision making processes of energy regulatory institutions. Common tasks for energy regulators (stemming from the need for economic regulation) are discussed. Ownership structure in the regulated sector has strong impact on the regulation. Publicly owned utilities are still dominant form in many economies (both in emerging and developed markets), so the challenges regulators face in this situation will be looked at in a dedicated lecture. Also, a dedicated case study on Oman will be introduced in this first module.

Day 2– Tuesday: will be dedicated to a site visit to the PAKS nuclear power plant, with presentation on the plant operations

MODULE 2 – PRICE AND TARIFF REGULATION (Day 3 –Wednesday)

One of the principal tasks of energy regulators is to set or authorise regulated prices for the companies under regulation. Participants will be provided with the theoretical basics and also an overview of the price regulatory process, including the setting of the revenue requirement, tariff design alternatives and questions in the choice of a price regulatory regime. Participants will be involved in a hands-on exercise to determine a tariff based on their new skills. A dedicated presentation will cover retail price regulation and social issues in emerging economies. The available models of retail price regulation, pro and contras of the various price setting mechanism will be look at in details. Emerging social issues of market reforms, possible instruments to handle social issues (energy poverty, coverage issues), and their advantages – disadvantages will be introduced.

MODULE 3 – COMPETITION AND REGULATION IN ELECTRICITY AND GAS; IMPACT OF REENEWABLE POLICY GOALS (Day 4 –Thursday)

A major change in electricity industry structure which also transforms the regulator’s entire job is when competition is introduced into the operations of the traditionally vertically integrated sector. This part of the course will introduce the basic ideas and principles behind recent restructuring and liberalisation process in the electricity sector, with a special emphasis on the competitiveness issue. The practice of unbundling and providing regulated access to essential facilities is discussed. Different models of wholesale and retail competition are introduced. Dedicated lecture will cover the natural gas sector, where additional challenges are faced in introducing competition amongst suppliers. Issues with network access and long term contract on competition will be addressed in details. Climate change concerns coupled with high oil prices and increasing government support are driving increasing renewable energy legislation and incentives all around the world. The role of energy regulators in recognizing the advantages of renewables is very complex. Regulators are to provide necessary supports to develop new project while these incentives must be consistent with basic regulatory policies. Participants will learn about the renewable policy instruments and their use in the energy sector with focus on the regulatory tools to support renewable energy. The impact of renewables on the functioning of competitive energy markets (e.g. merit order effects, and impacts on investments in generation) will also be assessed. The new emerging directions in renewables policies to make support schemes more competitive by utilizing tenders will be scrutinized based on examples of best practices of EU member states as well as in non-EU countries.

 

MODULE 4– THE INTERLINKS IN ENERGY POLICY AND REGULATION (Day 5- Friday)

This special day is dedicated to the introduction ion of the EU energy policy fundamentals, where the main drivers and targets of the present EU policy will be discussed, including security of supply considerations, climate commitments, renewable policies, technology dynamics and digitalization presently driving the European policy agenda. The impact of these policies on the sector regulation will be introduced. Although based on European examples, the lessons learnt from the lecture cover global trends in energy market developments and its regulation. A dedicated presentation will cover the global gas market trends and competition policy related issues in the sector. The value chain in natural gas markets, operations of LNG markets, the present trends in the EU gas market regulation (source diversification and liberalization) and the infrastructure regulation will be introduced with illustrative cases. The various type of price formation in natural gas markets will be introduced and market transparency and monitoring issues will also be covered in the presentation.

 

MODULE 5 – INVESTMENT AND INNOVATION INCENTIVES (Day 6 – Saturday)

The ‘missing money’ problem in the energy sector is a phenomenon that affects not only the developing countries, but recently also frequently appear in developed countries as well. If the required investment levels are not achieved in a longer time horizon, it could seriously affect the service quality within the electricity sector. The details of incentive regulations, to overcome some of the problems in electricity network will be looked at, and the interaction of regulation and service quality will be assessed. A case study on Italy will serve as basis for examining the emerging issues in a real country example. The country serves as a good illustration, how innovative solutions in the sector could be incentivized, helping to solve some critical issues in electricity network regulation.

Course registration

ERRA Full Members EUR 1 230 + 27% VAT
ERRA Associate Members EUR 1 440 + 27% VAT
Non-Member Regulators EUR 1 550 + 27% VAT
Non-regulators EUR 2 175 + 27% VAT

Tuition fee includes: training materials, lunches, coffee breaks during the training course and a social programme.

Accommodation cost for 6 nights can be added to the tuition fee in the amount of 400 EUR if you chose to stay at the training venue (European Youth Centre Budapest (EYCB); http://www.eycb.coe.int).

Please be informed that 6 nights of accommodation at the course venue – European Youth Center (EYCB) can be added (July 08-13). The venue provides a very convenient access to the classroom where the course is organised.

Participants are accommodated in private rooms with private bathroom included, but there are no television and air conditioner in the rooms. For photos please visit: https://www.coe.int/en/web/youth/eycb-guestroomsIn case you need extra nights for your stay, a separate form will be sent to you with the confirmation letter. Single room rate is € 66/night (including breakfast and VAT).

Course location

Budapest

Hungary

European Youth Centre Budapest (EYCB)
Address: 1-3 Zivatar Str., H-1024 Budapest
Tel.: +36 1 438 1030 ǀ Fax +36 1 212 4076
E-mail: tni.e1537943070oc@ta1537943070irate1537943070rcesb1537943070cye1537943070
Web: www.eycb.coe.int

Read more

ROLE AND FUNCTIONS OF THE REGULATOR

8:30

Opening address and introduction by participants

Szabó, László

Director, Regional Center for Energy Policy Research (REKK), Hungary

9:15

Theory, principles and institutions of regulation in the energy sector

Kaderják, Péter

Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Policy, Ministry of Innovation and Technology, Hungary

10:45

Coffee break and Group Photo

11:15

Global trends in electricity sector design and regulation

Kaderják, Péter

Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Policy, Ministry of Innovation and Technology, Hungary

12:30

Lunch

13:30

Electricity regulation in practice: the Case of Oman

Al Hinai, Abdulwahhab

Director of Licensing & Legal Affairs, Authority for Electricity Regulation, Oman

15:00

Coffee break

15:30

Group Work I.: Introducing the off-class assignment for the week

The Group Assignment will last during the entire period of the Training Course. Participants will be grouped and requested to work on the exercise throughout the week. Moderator:

Szabó, László

Director, Regional Center for Energy Policy Research (REKK), Hungary

19:00

Social Program

Group Dinner
Please be at 18:40 at the entrance of EYCB. Venue: Restaurant “Trófea Grill” (Address: Margit körút 2.)

SITE VISIT OF PAKS NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

8:30

Departure for Paks Nuclear Power Plant

10:30

Site Visit of Paks Nuclear Power Plant

Visitors Centre
Secondary System
12:30

Lunch

13:30

Presentation of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant

15:30

Departure for Budapest

PRICE & TARIFF REGULATION

8:30

Fundamentals of price regulation in the energy sector - 1

Berisha, Ardian

Regulatory specialist, Energy Regulators Regional Association (ERRA)

10:00

Coffee break

10:30

Fundamentals of price regulation in the energy sector – 2

Berisha, Ardian

Regulatory specialist, Energy Regulators Regional Association (ERRA)

11:30

Incentive Mechanisms: Losses Reduction and Spinning Reserve

Al Hinai, Abdulwahhab

Director of Licensing & Legal Affairs, Authority for Electricity Regulation, Oman

12:30

Lunch

13:30

Price regulation game

Kotek, Péter

Senior Research Associate, Regional Center for Energy Policy Research (REKK), Hungary

14:45

Coffee break

15:15

Energy supply security and regulation – the case of natural gas

Takácsné Tóth, Borbála

Senior Researcher, Regional Centre for Energy Policy Research (REKK), Hungary

COMPETITION AND REGULATION IN ELECTRICITY AND GAS

8:30

Competition and regulation on restructured electricity markets

Houmoller, Anders Plejdrup

CEO, Houmoller Consulting Aps, Denmark

10:30

Coffee break

11:00

Electricity market integration and related regulatory issues

Houmoller, Anders Plejdrup

CEO, Houmoller Consulting Aps, Denmark

12:30

Lunch

13:30

Retail price regulation and social issues in emerging markest

Kerekes, Lajos

Senior Research Associate, Regional Centre for Energy Policy Research (REKK), Hungary

15:00

Coffee break

15:30

Renewable energy: regulatory and market issues

Szabó, László

Director, Regional Center for Energy Policy Research (REKK), Hungary

THE INTERLINKS BETWEEN ENERGY POLICY AND REGULATION

8:30

EU energy policy and regulation

Finger, Matthias

Lausanne Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Switzerland

10:00

Coffee break

10:30

Competition and regulation on restructured natural gas markets

Vekony, Andras

Senior Research Associate, Regional Centre for Energy Policy Research (REKK), Hungary

12:00

Lunch

13:30

Hot topics – roundtable discussion

Moderated by the Course Director

Szabó, László

Director, Regional Center for Energy Policy Research (REKK), Hungary

15:00

Independent group work

INVESTMENT, INNOVATION INCENTIVES AND CONCLUSION

08:30

Case study: Service quality regulation in Italy

Lo Schiavo, Luca

Deputy Director, Italian Regulatory Authority for Energy, Networks and Environment, Italy

10:00

Coffee break

10:30

Country Case Study: Italy

Regulatory experience on innovation in Italy; Smart metering (2nd generation), smart grid and storage

Lo Schiavo, Luca

Deputy Director, Italian Regulatory Authority for Energy, Networks and Environment, Italy

12:00

Recap of the Training Course

Szabó, László

Director, Regional Center for Energy Policy Research (REKK), Hungary

12:30

Final test

13:15

Lunch

14:15

Presentation of the off-class assignments by participants

Szabó, László

Director, Regional Center for Energy Policy Research (REKK), Hungary

15:45

Course Evaluation
Group Photo
Signing the Alumni Book

Al Hinai, Abdulwahhab

Director of Licensing & Legal Affairs, Authority for Electricity Regulation, Oman

Berisha, Ardian

Regulatory specialist, Energy Regulators Regional Association (ERRA)

Finger, Matthias

Lausanne Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Switzerland

Houmoller, Anders Plejdrup

CEO, Houmoller Consulting Aps, Denmark

Kaderják, Péter

Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Policy, Ministry of Innovation and Technology, Hungary

Kerekes, Lajos

Senior Research Associate, Regional Centre for Energy Policy Research (REKK), Hungary

Kotek, Péter

Senior Research Associate, Regional Center for Energy Policy Research (REKK), Hungary

Lo Schiavo, Luca

Deputy Director, Italian Regulatory Authority for Energy, Networks and Environment, Italy

Szabó, László

Director, Regional Center for Energy Policy Research (REKK), Hungary

Takácsné Tóth, Borbála

Senior Researcher, Regional Centre for Energy Policy Research (REKK), Hungary

Vekony, Andras

Senior Research Associate, Regional Centre for Energy Policy Research (REKK), Hungary

Please note that Training Materials are available only for registered participants (who fully paid the tuition fee) and ERRA Members. Please LOGIN with your username and password.

We will be posting all the training course materials on the ERRA website prior to the Course so that you can download these and bring them to Budapest. The training course materials and presentations will be available in the order of receipt, from June 25.

If you face any problems, please feel free to contact us!

 

Nr. Country First Name Last Name Organization Job Title
1NigeriaPrincessAgwuNigerian Electricity Regulatory Commission (NERC)Assistant Manager, Customer Care
2NigeriaPamelaAkubueNigerian Electricity Regulatory Commission (NERC)Assistant Manager
3United Arab EmiratesHasanAl HosaniDepartment of EnergyFuel and Production Planning Engineer
4OmanLamyaAl KindiAuthority for Electricity Regulation (AER)Analyst
5Saudi ArabiaYousefAl MarwanGCC Interconnection AuthorityMarket Operator
6GeorgialevanAsanidzeRMG GroupChief Power Engineer
7CroatiaNatašaBakovićCroatian Energy Regulatory Agency (HERA)Associate for Tariff Systems and Thermal Energy Market
8MoldovaSofiaBalabanNational Energy Regulatory Agency of the Republic of MoldovaConsultant, Legal Department
9TurkeyAbdullahBaşakEnergy Market Regulatory Authority (EMRA)Assistant Energy Expert
10TurkeyYaseminBozkurtEnergy Market Regulatory Authority (EMRA)Asistant Energy Specialist
11GeorgiaKristineChapidzeGeorgian National Energy and Water Supply Regulatory Commission (GNERC)Leading Specialist of Methodological Support Department
12MozambiqueYolandaChiauCNELECMember of Monitoring and Compliance Commitee
13TurkeyEzgiCuraEnergy Market Regulatory Authority (EMRA)Assistant Energy Expert
14MoldovaDanielaDanNational Energy Regulatory Agency of the Republic of MoldovaConsultant, Legal Department
15Cape VerdeEvandroDelgadoAgency for Economic Regulation (ARE)Regulatory Technician
16MoldovaDanielaErezanuNational Energy Regulatory Agency of MoldovaSuperior Specialist
17ItalyLorenzoFrosaliEnel SpAClimate Change and Renewable Energy Policies Analyst
18ItalyFrancescoGueriniEnel SpALow Carbon and European Energy Policies Analyst
19MozambiqueClaudia RitaGuibundaCNELECMember of Economic Regulation
20MoldovaIulianGuzunThe National Energy Regulatory Agency of the Republic of Moldova (ANRE)Consultant, Legal Department
21TurkeyArda CanGüleşenEnergy Market Regulatory Authority (EMRA)Assistant Energy Expert
22NigeriaJa'afarIbrahimNigerian Electricity Regulatory Commission (NERC)Forum Secretary
23United Arab EmiratesMohamedIsmail AlhosaniDepartment of EnergyLegal Officer
24Sri LankaNelumKalansuriyaCeylon Electricity Board (CEB)Chief Engineer (Energy Sales)
25TurkeySevimKalkanEnergy Market Regulatory Authority (EMRA)Assistant Energy Expert
26TurkeyGözdeKandemirEnergy Market Regulatory Authority (EMRA)Assistant Energy Expert
27LatviaIevaLezdiņaPublic Utilities Commission (PUC)Chancellery and Archive Division Senior Clerk
28RwandaNoelMusabyimanaRwanda Utilities Regulatory Authority (RURA)Tariff Analysis Officer
29RwandaAlbertNgabonzizaRwanda Utilities Regulatory Authority (RURA)Tariff Monitoring and Market Analysis Officer
30RwandaClarisseNibagwireRwanda Utilities Regulatory Authority (RURA)Renewable Energy Officer
31RwandaAimeeNshimirimanaRwanda Utilities Regulatory Authority (RURA)Business Plan Analysis Officer
32NigeriaOnyebuchiOkechukwuNigerian Electricity Regulatory Commission (NERC)Assistant Manager, Human Resource
33Cape VerdeArturSanchesAgency for Economic Regulation (ARE)Regulatory Technician
34MoldovaStefanSeracutaNational Energy Regulatory Agency of the Republic of MoldovaSenior Specialist, Department of Investments, Direction of Electrical Energy and Renewables
35TurkeyHilalSönmezEnergy Market Regulatory Authority (EMRA)Assistant Energy Expert
36GeorgiaAnaTaktakishviliGeorgian National Energy and Water Supply Regulatory Commission (GNERC)Leading Specialist of Legal Department
37GeorgiaIrakliTsikoridzeGeorgian National Energy and Water Supply Regulatory Commission (GNERC)Leading Specialist of Methodological Support Department
38TurkeyOnurUyanustaEnergy Market Regulatory Authority (EMRA)Assistant Energy Expert
39MoldovaDenisVasilievNational Energy Regulatory Agency of the Republic of MoldovaSenior Consultant, Department for Regulations
40Cape VerdeLeodemiloVieiraAgency for Economic Regulation (ARE)Regulatory Technician
41Sri LankaUpulkaWeeraratneCeylon Electricity Board (CEB)Deputy General Manager (Energy Marketing)
42MozambiqueArlindoZandamelaCNELECEconomist
43TurkeyMustafa OzanÇelebiEnergy Market Regulatory Authority (EMRA)Energy Expert
44TurkeyHasan YavuzÜnsalEnergy Market Regulatory Authority (EMRA)Assistant Energy Expert
45CroatiaOlgaŠtajdohar-PađenCroatian Energy Regulation Agency (HERA)Senior Associate for High-Efficiency Cogeneration
46CroatiaNinaŠušnjarCroatian Energy Regulatory Agency (HERA)Senior Associate for High-Efficiency Cogeneration

Venue/ Accommodation

European Youth Centre Budapest (EYCB)
Address: Zivatar u. 1-3., H-1024 Budapest
Tel.: +36 1 438 1030 ǀ Fax: +36 1 212 4076
E-mail: tni.e1537943070oc@ta1537943070irate1537943070rcesb1537943070cye1537943070
Web: www.eycb.coe.int

Tuition fee includes: training materials, lunches, coffee breaks during the training course and a social programme.

Please be informed that 6 nights of accommodation at the course venue – European Youth Center (EYCB) can be added (July 08-13). The venue provides a very convenient access to the classroom where the course is organised.

Participants are accommodated in private rooms with private bathroom included, but there are no television and air conditioner in the rooms. For photos please visit: https://www.coe.int/en/web/youth/eycb-guestrooms. In case you need extra nights for your stay, a separate form will be sent to you with the confirmation letter. Single room rate is € 66/night (including breakfast and VAT).

View map >> 


Visa

Please verify the visa requirements of Hungary by contacting the Hungarian Embassy in your country. The list of diplomatic missions is available here: http://www.kormany.hu/en/ministry-of-foreign-affairs-and-trade/missions. The list of countries whose citizens do not require visas to enter Hungary can be found at http://konzuliszolgalat.kormany.hu/visa-waiver-agreements.

List of third countries, where a Schengen state issues visas on behalf of Hungary is available on this page: http://konzuliszolgalat.kormany.hu/visa-issuance-on-behalf-of-hungary.

In case you need an entry visa, please immediately contact the ERRA Secretariat! To prepare a visa invitation letter for you, please send us your passport copy. 


Airport Transfers/ Travel Information

Budapest Ferenc Liszt International Airport (formerly Ferihegy):

  • Located 16 kilometres (9,9 mi) east-southeast of the centre of Budapest
  • Central telephone number for information: +36 1 296 7000
  • http://www.bud.hu/english
  • The transfer time to/from the airport to the downtown is approximately 45-60 minutes (subject to traffic)

Shuttle bus

miniBUD (http://www.minibud.hu/) is the official airport shuttle service company providing fixed-priced transfer service between Budapest Airport – Budapest city center – Budapest Airport. The miniBUD airport shuttle service counters located on the arrivals level of Budapest Airport.

Rate to the EYCB:

  • one-way: HUF 4400 (approx. 15,71 EUR)
  • round trip: HUF 7900 (approx. 28,21EUR)

Taxi from the Airport

There is an official airport taxi company (Főtaxi) available at the Arrival Hall of the Terminals. All Főtaxi cars are equipped with POS terminal, therefore passengers can pay with credit card as well. Reservations can be made in person at Főtaxi booths located at the exit at Terminal 2A and 2B. At the taxi rank in front of the stands taxis are parking continuously waiting for passengers.

Rates (for reference purposes only): around HUF 8500 (27 EUR) for one way.

Please avoid using non-regulated providers offering taxi at the terminal buildings!

Public Transportation

A direct transfer bus ‘100E’ operates between the airport and Deák Ferenc tér in the city centre. A special fare applies: the “Airport shuttle bus single ticket” for the price of 900 HUF is required for each trip.


Calling a Taxi in Budapest

Please find below the list of larger taxi companies in Budapest:

  • Taxi 2000: +36 1 200 0000
  • Citytaxi: +36 1 211 1111
  • Főtaxi: +36 1 222 2222
  • 6×6 Taxi: +36 1 666 6666
Public Transport

Budapest’s network of public transport services (BKK) includes buses, trolleybuses, trams, subway (Metró) and over ground suburban trains (HÉV).

For ticket prices and more information please visit the official website of BKK: http://www.bkk.hu/en/tickets-and-passes/prices/ 

Booklet in PDF with useful information is available here >>

Railway Stations

International trains operate from the three largest stations:

  • Keleti pályaudvar: VIII., Baross tér. Tel: (+36-1) 413 – 4610.
  • Nyugati pályaudvar: VI., Nyugati tér Tel: (+36-1) 349-8503
  • Déli pályaudvar I. Krisztina krt. 37. Tel: (+36-1) 375-6593

All three international railway stations are part of the Budapest Underground system, the Metró. The Déli is on the Red (Number 2) line, Keleti is on the Red (Number 2) and Green (Number 4) lines and the Nyugati is on the Blue (Number 3) line.

Official website of the Hungarian State Railways: https://www.mavcsoport.hu/en


General Information

Currency:      HUF (Hungarian Forint)
Currency Exchange Rates: http://www.mnb.hu/en/arfolyamok

Time zone:   UTC/GMT +1 hours

Electricity:   230 V/50 Hz (Europlug)

Dial Codes:   +36 –

Emergency Calls:    112 (ambulance, police and fire)

Smoking:   Smoking is not permitted in public places, dining and meeting facilities.

Weather:   http://www.meteoprog.hu/en/weather/Budapest/
http://koponyeg.hu/t/Budapest

Information on
Budapest:
  http://bebudapest.hu/
http://www.budapest.com/
https://www.budapestinfo.hu/home.html
http://www.funzine.hu/

Course location

Budapest

Hungary

European Youth Centre Budapest (EYCB)
Address: 1-3 Zivatar Str., H-1024 Budapest
Tel.: +36 1 438 1030 ǀ Fax +36 1 212 4076
E-mail: tni.e1537943070oc@ta1537943070irate1537943070rcesb1537943070cye1537943070
Web: www.eycb.coe.int

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